Expertise

Sports Medicine Specialist
Orthopedic Surgeon

Education

Medical School - Tufts University
State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Residency in Orthopedic Surgery
Aria Health System, Fellowship in Sports Medicine
Lenox Hill Hospital, Fellowship in Sports Medicine
Tufts University, B.S.

 

 

Interests

Dr. Neil Pathare is a fellowship-trained Orthopaedic Surgeon specializing in Sports Medicine. While his interest focuses on the knee and shoulder, he treats a variety of conditions in both the athlete and non-athlete. He is an advocate of conservative management and works closely with all of his patients to create an individualized treatment plan to get every patient back to a healthy and active lifestyle. When surgery is necessary, he performs all of his procedures through minimally invasive or arthroscopic techniques. He specializes in ligament reconstruction, cartilage restoration procedures, meniscus pathology, rotator cuff and labrum tears, as well as fracture care, tendon repair, and joint replacement.

 
 
 

Awards

Best Fellow Paper, Lenox Hill Hospital 18th Annual Orthopaedic Research Day Symposium. Variations in Anatomic ACL Reconstruction: Radiographic Parameters for Standardizing Femoral Tunnel Placement With a BPTB Graft.

Nominated for the Charles S. Neer II Award of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons. Glenoid Reconstruction for Recurrent Post-Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Dislocation.

Professional Memberships

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

 


 

Publications

Kinematic Analysis of the Indirect Femoral Insertion of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Implications for Anatomic Femoral Tunnel Placement. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery. November 2014;30(11):1430-8.

Safe Zone for Retractor Placement to the Lumbar Spine via the transpsoas approach. J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). April 2013;21(1):77-81.

A Reproducible Landmark for the Tibial Tunnel Origin in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Avoiding a Vertical Graft in the Coronal Plane. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery. July 2008;24(7):843-845.

Anatomical Glenoid Reconstruction for Recurrent Anterior Glenohumeral Instability with Glenoid Deficiency using an Autogenous Tricortical Iliac Crest Bone Graft. Am J Sports Med. February 2006;34(2):205-212.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency Alters the In Vivo Motion of the Tibiofemoral Cartilage Contact Points in Both the Anteroposterior and Mediolateral Directions. J. Bone Joint Surg. Am. August 2006;88(8):1826-1834.

The 6 Degrees of Freedom Kinematics of the Knee after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency: An In Vivo Imaging Analysis. Am J Sports Med. August 2006;34(8):1240-1246.

The Role of the Indirect Femoral Insertion of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Restraining Tibial Translation and Rotation: Implications for Anatomic Femoral Tunnel Placement With Use of a BPTB Graft. Podium presentation at the Annual Meeting of the AOSSM. Chicago, IL. July 2013.

Presented at the Lenox Hill Hospital 19th Annual Orthopaedic Research Day Symposium. New York, NY. June 2013.

Variations in Anatomic ACL Reconstruction: Radiographic Parameters for Standardizing Femoral Tunnel Placement with a BPTB Graft. Presented at the Lenox Hill Hospital 18th Annual Orthopaedic Research Day Symposium. New York, NY. June 2012.

Presented at the Fellows’ Sports Medicine Conference at West Point. West Point, NY. June 2012.

A Reproducible Landmark for the Tibial Tunnel Origin in ACL Reconstruction: Avoiding a vertical graft. Poster Presentation at the AAOS 73rd Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL. March 2006.

Recent Advances in In-vivo Investigation of Musculoskeletal Joints. Presented at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Boston, MA. February 2005.

Glenoid Reconstruction for Recurrent Post-Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability/Dislocation. Podium presentation at the AAOS Annual Meeting and presented at the AOSSM Specialty Day. San Francisco, CA. March 2004.

Glenoid Reconstruction for Recurrent Post-Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Dislocation. Presented at the Open Meeting of the ASES. Dana Point, CA. October 2003.